Diets of Inclusions rather than Exclusion.

inclusion

Intro

Nutrition can be a seemingly trendy topic in today’s society, but in actuality – nutrition is a science. The spawn of fad diets, latest food crazes, and non-evidence based nutrition theories have left many individuals in the dark when it comes to certain nutrition topics.

The purpose of this article is to shed some light on some hot nutrition issues currently surfacing today.

The Importance of Nutrition

If you are reading this article, chances are you currently in the contemplation or action stage of change and are making conscious nutrition decisions to improve your health and fitness. Did you know nutrition can play a more integral role than training for obtaining the results you want?

You simply cannot outwork a bad diet.

Diets of Exclusion

Diets of exclusion are becoming more prevalent with trendy nutrition followings. What is a diet of exclusion? A diet of exclusion is a…

View original post 764 more words

Advertisements

880b9cfb5c9b858b61b6cd02d036a928

Image  —  Posted: April 24, 2014 in Uncategorized

Pantry Chef

These granola bar bites have ever so eloquently been dubbed “old people cookies” because of their ingredients. But take them seriously because they are VERY yummy! I like to make these little bites to eat for breakfast, as a post work out snack, or as a mid-day pick-me-up. They pack well and can be made into various shapes such as round cookies, square cookies, or bars.

They are super healthy and kids LOVE them. You won’t believe these vegan goodies are made without butter, flour, eggs, or added sugar! The bananas and dried fruit add lots of texture and sweetness so enjoy!

Banana Oatmeal Granola Bar Bite Cookies

Serving: 24 cookies
Time: 35 minutes
Level: Easy (super kid friendly, so let them help!)

3 ripe bananas (wait until they are nice and spotty. They are sweeter that way.)
2 c. oats (you can use whole wheat, steel cut, quick cooking, or most any other type…

View original post 136 more words

Eating an effective amount of protein while staying within your allocated carbohydrates and fat for the day is extremely tricky. My best advice is to plan your meals around a high protein source and add carbs equaling the amount of protein. The following are the best high protein-low carb/low fat protein sources:

Beef

  • Hamburger patty 95% lean ground beef, 6oz = 36 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, and 8 grams of fat

Chicken

  • Chicken breast 6oz = 54 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 6 grams of fat

Fish

  • Tilapia 6oz = 42 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 6 grams of fat
  • Salmon 3oz = 19 grams of protein, 0 rams of carbs, 10 grams of fat
  • Cod 6oz = 30 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 6 grams od fat
  • Canned Tuna(in water) 6oz = 44 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 6 grams of fat

Pork

  • Lean Pork chop/loin 6oz= 42 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 6 grams of fat

Eggs/Dairy

  • Egg, whole = 6 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 5 grams of fat
  • Egg, white only = 4 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 0 grams of fat
  • Skim Milk, per oz = 1 gram of protein, 1 gram of carbs, o grams of fat
  • Low Fat Cottage cheese, 1 cup = 28 grams of protein, 6 grams of carbs, 2 grams of fat
  • Greek Yogurt, 1 cup = 20 grams of protein, 6 grams of carbs, 8 grams of fat
  • Soft cheeses (Mozzarella, Brie, Feta )  per oz = 5 grams of protein, 0 gramfs of carbs, 6 grams of fat
  • Medium cheeses (Cheddar, Swiss) per oz = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbs, 9 grams of fat
  • Hard cheeses (Parmesan) = per oz 10 grams of protein, 1 gram of carbs, 7 grams of fat

Shortcut: An ounce of meat or fish has approximately 7 grams of protein if cooked, and about 6 grams if raw.